FAQs

Q?

How often should we have intercourse to increase our chances of getting pregnant?

A.

Regular intercourse (3 times per week) will allow most fertile couples to conceive. For the best chance of pregnancy you should have intercourse in the days leading up to Ovulation ('Fertile wondow') and also on the Day of Ovulation. Sperm can live in the female reproductive tract for up to 5 days, so having intercourse before Ovulation ensures there are sperm 'waiting' for the egg when it is released.

Q?

I’m underweight. Can this affect my fertility?

A.

Being underweight (BMI <18.5) can cause menstruation and ovulation to stop. You should seek help from a dietician in order to gain weight in a healthy and controlled manner. You should also see your doctor to see if there is an underlying medical condition preventing you from gaining weight.

 

Q?

Does Alcohol really affect fertility?

A.

Studies have shown that even moderate alcohol consumption ( 5 or less alcoholic drinks per week) can lower fertility levels. If you are having difficulty conceiving then its best to give up alcohol completely to give yourself the best chance of getting pregnant.

Q?

I conceived my first child very easily. Why do I not seem to be able to get pregnant again?

A.

It is possible to get pregnant once and then experience difficulties the second time around. This is called Secondary Infertility. At times this can be even more difficult to deal with than primary infertility (where a couple have no children). Possible causes are:

Advanced Female age: As a woman gets older the quality and quantity of her eggs decreases. This is the case regardless of whether she had a baby in the past. Read more here.

Structural Complications: Complications during a prior delivery such as uterine infection, uterine adhesions or adhesions that develop around the fallopian tubes can cause problems.

Reduced Sperm Quality: Sperm quality changes over time. If your partners health, diet or lifestyle has changed since the birth of your first child then he should have a Semen Analysis carried out to check the quality of his sperm.

Q?

My Partner is too shy to attend a clinic to have a Semen Analysis. Is it really that important?

A.

Fertility is not just a female issue. In over 40% of cases a problem can be identified with male fertility. It is unethical and unfair for a woman to take any form of fertility medication if her partner has not had his sperm quality checked. It is not always necessary to attend a clinic to check Sperm Quality. A home testing kit such as SwimCount is a great starting point as it can be performed in the privacy of your own home.

Q?

How Long Should We Try Before Seeing a Doctor?

A.

In general, if you are less than 35 years old and have been having regular, unprotected intercourse for over 1 year then you should seek advice or have some initial fertility investigations carried out. If you are over 35 years old then it is recomended that you seek help after 6 months. If you or your partner have an underlying medical condition which may reduce your fertility level than you should seek help sooner than this.